Liveinternet WINGS PALETTE Top@Mail.ru AVIATION TOP 100Avitop.com
AVIA CAMOUFLAGE PROFILES ARCHIVE v.4.74-new



News | Catalogue | Pilots | Carriers | Paper Models | Library | Markings | AirCamo Guide | Pilot's Album | Articles | Links | About | Switch to Russian


/Markings
World War I
Fighters
Bombers
Attack
Transport
Airliners

Other
Sea
Special
Helicopters
Interwar
Fighters
Bombers
Attack
Transport
Airliners

Other
Sea
Special
Helicopters
World War II
Fighters
Bombers
Attack
Transport
Airliners

Other
Sea
Special
Helicopters
Cold war
Fighters
Bombers
Attack
Transport
Airliners

Other
Sea
Special
Helicopters
Modern
Fighters
Bombers
Attack
Transport
Airliners

Other
Special
Sea
Helicopters
Drones
Markings

America | Europe | Middle East | Africa | ex-USSR | Asia and P.Ocean
Austria
Albania
Belgium
Hungary
Denmark
Ireland
Spain
Cyprus
Luxemburg
Macedonia
Netherlands
Portugal
Slovakia
Finland
Croatia
Czechia
Czechoslovakia
Sweden


Spain

Spanish Air Force (Ejercito del Aire Espanol)

1911 to 1931


Main

Rudder

From the very beginnings of Spanish military aviation in 1911, the national markings applied to all of its machines consisted of red-yellow-red wing roundels and fin flash with the national flag colours.

1931 to 1936


Main

Rudder

Rudder (variant)

With the proclamation of the Spanish Republic in 1931, the colour of the lower stripe of the national flag was changed from red to purple. This alteration was also reflected on the national markings of Spanish military aircraft.

Example: de Havilland DH.84/89/90 Dragon/Dragon Rapide/Dominie

The width and size of the rudder stripes varied according to aircraft type, and sometimes the fin flash only partially covered the rudder surfaces.

Example: Breguet Br.19

1945 to 1939


Fuselage

Fuselage (variant)

Wings

Rudder

Shortly after the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, and following several 'friendly fire' incidents, an order was issued by General Franco's HQ on 9 August 1936, according to which all Nationalist aircraft were to cover up their roundels with black paint, and the fin flash in white with a superimposed black St. Andrew's cross. Later on, the wings' black disks also received a white cross in order to improve their visibility under dawn or dusk conditions.

Example: Heinkel He.70/He.170

It was very common among Nationalist pilots to paint personal emblems on the fuselage black disks, most of the times in contrasting white paint. The commonest of them was this semi-official yoke-and-arrows Falangist emblem.

Example: Messerschmitt Bf.109B/C/D Bertha/Caesar/Dora


Fuselage and wings

Rudder

Wings

For the same security (and also political) reasons, the Republican side, while retaining the prewar tricolour fin flash in their aircraft, began covering up the wing roundels with red bands very early in the war. The size and width of these red bands varied wildly according to aircraft type, batch, or the painter's personal taste. Sometimes, they were extended right up to the wingtips, while others almost covered the entire fuselage length from cockpit to tail.

Example: Polikarpov I-15/I-152 (I-15bis)

Although usually deleted from the vast majority of Republican aircraft, tricolour roundels continued to be used (in combination with red bands) by certain prewar types through-out the entire war period.

1939 to 1945


Fuselage

Крылья

Rudder

After the end of the war, and with the re-creation of the Spanish Ejercito del Aire [Air Army] in November of 1939, new national markings were introduced. The old bicolour wing roundels substituted the wartime black disks with white crosses, but the fuselage and tail markings remained those of the Nationalist side. The only change was the red Falangist emblem, the symbol of the regime, applied (though not always) on the fuselage black disks from 1942.

Example: Heinkel He.112

1945 to Present


Fuselage and wings

Rudder

Around 1945, the yoke-and-arrows emblem was finally deleted in favour of a roundel with the national colours. This combination is still in use today, althogh the modern lower visibility requirements have seen the markings drastically reduced in size.

Example: Lockheed F-80/P-80 Shooting Star
Example: Lockheed F-104 Starfighter

by Stephen Sender


Last update: 05/08/2013
©2003-2018 WINGS PALETTE

Random image
AT-502/AT-802
AvCanada Topsites List
Rambler's Top100



This page generated in 0.049288034439087 seconds